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HealthcareLaw

obligation

Whatare your rights & obligations?

The United States government spends about $1.1 trillion for health care each year, which means, the government is writing checks for roughly $3,300 per person—man, woman, or child—each year.

Given the daunting task of keeping track of this massive amount of spending, not surprisingly, there have always been fraudsters who have taken advantage of the government’s inability to inspect, double-check, and verify the accuracy of each and every transaction.

Help

Howcan we help?

Healthcare law encompasses a wide variety of legal issues and a diverse group of clients.

We provide legal counseling and representation in federal and state fraud issues, including anti-kickback, self-referral, false claims and health information privacy, and corporate compliance matters. Our clients include hospitals, physicians and other traditional healthcare providers as well as pharmaceutical entities, medical device suppliers, insurance companies, and persons involved in medical imaging.

 

Previous Successes
PreviousSuccesses

Mark v. Anderson et al.

Cause No. 2015-515,467 in the 237th District Court of Lubbock County, Texas

Filed lawsuit on behalf of a physician  who was withdrawing from a medical practice to take another position. After extensive discovery and trial preparation, on the eve of trial, our client was able to settle his case by receiving the recompense for his interest in the medical practice.

Byers v. Meridian LTC, Ltd. et al.

Cause No. 2013-505-504 in the 99th District Court of Lubbock County, Texas

Defended a nursing home, its employees, and associated physicians in a lawsuit of the wrongful death of an elderly resident. After extensive litigation, the case was settled on favorable terms to our clients.

Represented Whistleblower in Qui Tam Lawsuit that Resulted in $2,929,162 Settlement.

The courageous whistleblower exposed the fact that an El Paso healthcare clinic was double-billing and over-billing government payers for the drug Remicade, also known as Infiximab, as well as billing for drugs illegally imported from Canada and other foreign countries.